Manic Depressive Studios

The opinions of an undergraduate film studies and creative writing major
Best Movies of All Time #39: Schindler’s List (1993) Directed by Steven Spielberg
Schindler’s List is one of the inescapable works of modern cinema. It is Steven Spielberg’s epic length film that observes the events of the Holocaust through the perspective of Oskar Schindler, a German during World War II that decided to use his power to save the lives of over a thousand Jewish people by hiring them to work in his factory. It is both a harrowing look at one of the worst moments in human history and an encouraging look at people standing up for what is right.
The most striking moments of the film are the scenes directly involving the devastation of the Holocaust. Small moments such as a man being executed for his inability to work efficiently intersperse grander massacres, such as the liquidation of the Krakow Ghetto. That scene is one of the most brutal in film, a nightmare brought back to life. Schindler watches from a hill above the town, unable to do anything more. The Jewish people are rarely treated as human beings, either used essentially as cheap cattle or being massacred by those who almost find the act tedious, becoming bored and playing the piano in the middle of committing genocide. Even Schindler is guilty of using the Jewish people, and the journey of the film is him learning the simple fact that humans deserve basic respect and dignity.
Schindler’s discoveries are juxtaposed against the atrocities committed by Amon Goethe, who runs the concentration camp shown in the film. It’s the little moments that make him truly monstrous. He wakes up in the morning and begins his day by sniping random inmates from his balcony. After witnessing Schindler’s ability to remain nice to what Goethe believes is a lesser people spurs him to try holding back when a boy fails at completing orders, but his opinion quickly changes as the boy leaves his house, causing him to shoot him. At its strongest level, Schindler’s List is the study of two very different mindsets; a capitalist discovering altruism and a sadist reveling in what must be the greatest moments of his life.
Schindler’s speech at the end of the film is numbing. After managing to save so many people, he gives one last goodbye to his workers before having to run, as he had kept up an appearance as working with the Nazis. In the middle of speaking, he breaks down when he realizes that he could have saved more people. It is after everything is said and done that he is allowed to cry. The final moments of the film are outstanding, as Spielberg lets his camera roll as the real people saved by Schindler walk by his grave and leave stones to represent their gratitude. Few moments in film are as touching.

Schindler’s List is Steven Spielberg’s masterpiece. It is the study of two very strange men in extreme circumstances while also containing some of the most riveting moments in all of cinema in the finest fictional portrayal of the Holocaust. It is a flurry of emotions as we look back on what desperately needs to be avoided and are saved by a faint glimmer of a world where mankind will stand up and fight for what is right.

Best Movies of All Time #39: Schindler’s List (1993)
Directed by Steven Spielberg

Schindler’s List is one of the inescapable works of modern cinema. It is Steven Spielberg’s epic length film that observes the events of the Holocaust through the perspective of Oskar Schindler, a German during World War II that decided to use his power to save the lives of over a thousand Jewish people by hiring them to work in his factory. It is both a harrowing look at one of the worst moments in human history and an encouraging look at people standing up for what is right.

The most striking moments of the film are the scenes directly involving the devastation of the Holocaust. Small moments such as a man being executed for his inability to work efficiently intersperse grander massacres, such as the liquidation of the Krakow Ghetto. That scene is one of the most brutal in film, a nightmare brought back to life. Schindler watches from a hill above the town, unable to do anything more. The Jewish people are rarely treated as human beings, either used essentially as cheap cattle or being massacred by those who almost find the act tedious, becoming bored and playing the piano in the middle of committing genocide. Even Schindler is guilty of using the Jewish people, and the journey of the film is him learning the simple fact that humans deserve basic respect and dignity.

Schindler’s discoveries are juxtaposed against the atrocities committed by Amon Goethe, who runs the concentration camp shown in the film. It’s the little moments that make him truly monstrous. He wakes up in the morning and begins his day by sniping random inmates from his balcony. After witnessing Schindler’s ability to remain nice to what Goethe believes is a lesser people spurs him to try holding back when a boy fails at completing orders, but his opinion quickly changes as the boy leaves his house, causing him to shoot him. At its strongest level, Schindler’s List is the study of two very different mindsets; a capitalist discovering altruism and a sadist reveling in what must be the greatest moments of his life.

Schindler’s speech at the end of the film is numbing. After managing to save so many people, he gives one last goodbye to his workers before having to run, as he had kept up an appearance as working with the Nazis. In the middle of speaking, he breaks down when he realizes that he could have saved more people. It is after everything is said and done that he is allowed to cry. The final moments of the film are outstanding, as Spielberg lets his camera roll as the real people saved by Schindler walk by his grave and leave stones to represent their gratitude. Few moments in film are as touching.

Schindler’s List is Steven Spielberg’s masterpiece. It is the study of two very strange men in extreme circumstances while also containing some of the most riveting moments in all of cinema in the finest fictional portrayal of the Holocaust. It is a flurry of emotions as we look back on what desperately needs to be avoided and are saved by a faint glimmer of a world where mankind will stand up and fight for what is right.

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